Dr. Weanus on Nearly Having To See a Patient

Dr. Weanus always studies his patients’ charts carefully. Who knows what clues, what tiny bit of information, suitable considered, processed and digested in his mighty brain, may produce the cure, the telling analysis, the means of improving the patient’s quality of life or, at least, a higher OHIP* fee?

Can anyone really say? So he pours over the chart, stroking his chin thoughtfully: what does the radiologist mean exactly, when he sees a slight opacity in the chest x-ray? Why it means I will have to order —

And then, alas, tragedy. He is interrupted. What brilliant thought, what insight is lost forever we can only guess — and worse, he is interrupted by a nurse!

A nurse!

“About that palliative patient in Exams you were supposed to see —”

Dr. Weanus erupts. He is incandescent. He positively glows in Outraged Physician Radiation. How dare you? he shouts. Who referred this so-called patient? I spoke to no emergency physician! This is a gross violation of procedure! I categorically refuse to see this patient!

” — she died.”

He waves a hand dismissively. “Oh, that’s all right then,” he says.

Head down, back to the chart, cheerful even.

My favourite internist.

__________

*OHIP: Ontario Health Insurance Plan, i.e. who pays Ontario physicians.

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  1. #1 by Maha on Tuesday 13 July 2010 - 1535

    Nurses shouldn’t be so foolish as to not realize that all great and mighty doctors learn everything they need to learn about the patients from their charts. Silly nurses!

  2. #2 by Atlanta Computer Rental on Friday 16 July 2010 - 1402

    Nurses shouldn’t be so foolish as to not realize that all great and mighty doctors learn everything they need to learn about the patients from their charts. Silly nurses!
    +1

  3. #3 by Art Doctor on Tuesday 20 July 2010 - 2004

    It’s sometimes better not to comment, so I won’t, except for this: great blog and keep writing!

  4. #4 by torontoinsurance on Wednesday 21 July 2010 - 0848

    This is why it is so hard to believe doctors to do the best for you. I think in some instances, the incentives are not aligned with the patient’s best interests. In an utopic world, each patient should be required to confirm any payment to the doctor by the OHIP provider, being able to add bonuses or discount the payment in case of mis-treatment.
    This would ensure that doctors who let patients die would not see much of the money either. I’m sure insurers would agree.

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