Posts Tagged Social media

Observations and Assessments

Notions to small for a blog post, all in one place, a.k.a. the periodic link dump.

Giving all aid short of actual help. First, some words from the American Nurses Association on Amanda Trujillo. The ANA finallyissued a news release, in which they absolutely avoided, like nervous grannies dithering over an icy stretch of sidewalk, any position at all. However, they are watching the case “closely.” They advise “nurses and the public not to rush to judgments about complex cases based on social media postings or other media coverage.” They tell nurses in trouble to avail  themselves of the “many resources available on its website”. That’s pretty well it.  Three Tweets and they could have saved themselves 323 words and a news release. Would have been a more honest display of actual content, too.

That’s gonna leave a mark. Meanwhile Kim McAllister over at Emergiblog administers a very judicious flogging to the ANA over said news release above. Jennifer Olin does more dissection here.

Big and growing. More resources on Amanda Trujillo, including media contacts and how to contribute to her cause at NurseFriendly’s site.

Funky, interesting and fabulous New Blogs! New to me, anyway.

  • Medical Ethics and Me has some great, relevant material on its collective blog. Deserves to have a much wider audience.
  • Greg Mercer: a very new blog, and a strong advocate for nurses

So what about Pinterest, anyway? Got my account, and am still puzzled by what exactly to do with it. (Though got a recipe for Olive Garden Alfredo Sauce.) HealthisSocial has some answers, but may also be mocking you.

Um, no? Does the World Really Need a 5-Inch Phone With a Stylus? (I would lose the stylus in about 10 minutes.)

Another float in the Parade of the Blindingly Obvious. Nurses need breaks! say health care leaders. (You think?)

The complaints are even more surprising given the culture of nursing. Rarely having time for rest and meal breaks is part of the nursing folklore. New graduate initiation practically stipulates that a requirement of successful floor nurses is a gargantuan bladder.

This culture is entrenched. A 2004 study published in the Journal of Nursing Administration revealed that hospital staff nurses were completely free of patient care responsibilities during a break or meal period less than half the shifts they worked. In 10%

of their shifts, nurses reported having no opportunity to sit down for a break or meal period. The rest of the time, nurses said they had time for a break, but no one was available to take over patient care

Next thing they’ll be telling us is nurses shouldn’t be punished for taking sick time.

“Weeds are the tithe we get for breaking the earth.” Too true. An elegy on the humble weed
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Time for the Talk

A tried and true (if tedious) bait and switch routine to draw attention to a serious issue.

Synchronicity is a weird and wonderful thing. Here I was talking about the my own promiscuous use of the F-bomb this week, and now a non-profit uses it as part of an advertising campaign in order to be relevant to the Gen Y demographic:

Fuck Cancer [according to the non-profit’s website] saves lives by teaching people how to look for cancer, instead of just find it. We change the way cancer society perceives cancer by challenging the stigma and the victim mentality. We shift the balance of power from the cancer to the patient, and turn “patients” into “cancer Fuckers”, fighters, and survivors.

I’m not very convinced, though, that “Fuck Cancer” as an advertising slogan — in the hope, it seems, that the concept will be go viral over social media — will be very effective. Attention getting, maybe, but in the end it feels too much like slacktivism: just point and click to a warm fuzzy. What do you think?

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The Nurse’s Social Media Advantage

Congratulations and multiple woots to Rob Fraser, who’s published his book, The Nurse’s Social Media Advantage. The publisher’s blurb:

Social media has reached into every profession – and nursing is no exception. Almost daily, new research and publishing methods emerge. This fast-paced, ever-changing way of disseminating information will continue to evolve, whether nurses participate or not. With the vital role that nursing plays in the health care community, nurses cannot afford to fall behind. Social media provides exciting possibilities for networking, creating content, finding and sharing information and collaborating to create a global nursing network.

These changes can be challenging, but STTI’s new book The Nurse’s Social Media Advantage: How Making Connections and Sharing Ideas Can Enhance Your Nursing Practice will provide you with the tools you need for success.

The book is available from Amazon here.

Rob mugging with his book. Pic from his personal blog.

You get the feeling Rob is going places. Anyway, well done.

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When Hospitals Block Facebook, Laziness Is The Real Issue

Phil Baumann argues that hospitals should seize the Twenty-First Century by the sub-epididymal masses and set free Twitter and Facebook. “Should hospitals block Facebook?” he asks,

That’s not really the question. Here’s the question:

Should hospitals block the 21st Century?

If they can, then that means they have access to technologies which can also probably cure all disease from the face of the earth.

Then they’d be out of business, and we wouldn’t have to fret about their policies over staples of mainstream communication like Facebook and Twitter. :)

And here’s the fiduciary responsibility part: the more comfortable a business is using social media internally, you know what happens? It becomes more proficient in marketing and public relations in our time.

Management is morally obligated to ensure the best care for patients. It’s also legally obligated to do what’s right for Investors.

I don’t disagree with Phil Baumann much about the supposed reasons hospitals block social networking sites: risk management, security and patient privacy are common excuses, and are mostly founded (as Baumann says) on fear and ignorance. But I think the real purpose of hospitals blocking Twitter and Facebook has more to do with control and productivity than risk reduction and confidentiality. Plainly speaking, social networking sites make people lazy.

Let me illustrate. My employer, Acme Regional Health Centre unblocked Facebook  and Twitter from hospital computers for a short time. I won’t exaggerate and say it was an unmitigated disaster, but when you sit down at a nursing station and see every computer terminal opened to Farmville, and the nurses in Resus are tweeting the nurses in Exams, there’s a problem.

The experiment lasted about a month. It failed because it ignored a fundamental fact of human nature: if people are given the choice of doing something amusing and fun, like playing on Facebook, and doing something tedious and boring, like filling in MARs*, amusing and fun will win every time.

And yes, it looks extremely poor if patients and their families catch you fooling with your Facebook photo albums, when you should be getting the bedpan for the 98 year-old in Obs Six.

In the end, health care professionals — I include physicians as well as nurses in this categorization — can’t act, well, professionally with social networking sites. The ideals suggested by Phil Baumann are exciting and visionary. The reality is somewhat more drab and prosaic.

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*Medical Administration Record

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